TRENDS

ZERO WASTE RETAIL

Zero-waste retail is a now emerging as a prominent sub-tribe within the eco-friendly movement. Trends have so far circled around the use of recyclable, local, natural ingredients but as consumer awareness deepens and people actively choose a low impact lifestyle, waste free offerings are gaining ground.

We believe that at the moment, smaller retailers are ahead of large players because they are more agile when it comes to adoption. They are able to take advantage of the more flexible nature work culture and creates processes that minimize and repurpose waste.

Thought leader and writer of the popular blog, “Trash is for Tossers,” has said, businesses and consumers can both start with making small changes, which have the potential to make a meaningful impact. For example, businesses can make sure people adopt the concept of BYOB (bring your own bag) when they come to shop. Moreover, in order to push the more passive, brands can advertise products and services as “better than options” to try and move the needle.

Curation also plays a major role when it comes to sustainability. When sourcing materials, companies need to be aware of the values their suppliers represent. They have to find a common thread of connect, uniting the entire value chain of a product or service.

While examples of industries repurposing the idea of waste are mushrooming, more than 60% consumers have not heard anything about zero waste movement yet, according to satista. com. The opportunities, therefore, are still unprecedented.

Trends have so far circled around the use of recyclable, local, natural ingredients but as consumer awareness deepens and people actively choose a low impact lifestyle, waste free offerings are gaining ground.

2.1

Package-Free Home Essentials

The ‘Package Free’ store sells items, ranging from personal to home care. Conceived by designer, Daniel Silverstein and environmental activist, Lauren Singer, the pop up has kept 1,597,640 plastic straws out of landfills. Silverstein uses discarded fabric to create collections and Singer says, she hasn’t created any trash since 2012

2.2

Zero Waste Cafes

Brighton based, Silo makes it easier for people to be environmentally-friendly. The coffee shop is package-free. It sources beans locally and serves in reusable glass jars, not paper cups. With over 25 billion Styrofoam coffee cups discarded every year in the USA alone, Silo helps people re-think their morning routine.

2.3

Eco-Friendly Salons

UK based, Ralph & Rice is a family-owned salon uses towels from recycled materials and allows for a refill of shampoo and conditioner at £2 discount. It works with luxury brand, Davines as the company uses a food-grade plastic and follows the guidelines of LifeGates’s Zero Impact Project, focused on lowering carbon dioxide emissions.

2.4

3D Printed Store Interiors

Bottletop is a London-based brand that combines sustainable luxury, ethical design, technical innovation and cross-cultural collaboration with a zero-waste philosophy. Collections are made from sustainably sourced materials, including upcycled metal and deforestation leather. It also designed its store with 3D printed store interior from almost an estimated 60,000 recycled plastic bottles.